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DESIGN 369 A: Visual Systems

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Meeting Time: 
MW 12:00pm - 2:50pm
Location: 
ART 247
SLN: 
13074
Instructor:
Annabelle Gould
Annabelle Gould

Syllabus Description:

F A C U L T Y

Annabelle Gould
Associate Professor, Visual Communication Design
agould@uw.edu
Office Hours: Th 10:30–11:30am / via Google Hangouts
Sign up for a time slot here.

 

O V E R V I E W

This course will focus on the creation and development of a cohesive, innovative visual system applied across a variety of media formats. In this class you will explore organizational strategies and graphic interpretations of themes using typography and imagery, with the objective of creating a related network of dynamic solutions. Everything covered in Advanced Typography, Introduction to Motion, Branding and Interface I will be utilized in this class.

The challenge when developing a comprehensive design program is to present a compelling message that uses engaging visual language without becoming repetitive or disjointed in the execution. Topics covered in this course include:

1) The construction of meaning through verbal and visual language;
2) Designing for a system (rather than a single product) that includes a wide range of media formats and sizes;
3) Integrating color, type, imagery and graphic elements to produce a compelling visual language that reinforces the chosen theme/topic;
4) Using a rigorous design process to develop provocative and smart solutions;
5) Issues related to audience, image creation and production. 

 

C O U R S E   S T R U C T U R E

Lectures, critiques, and workdays will be virtual — through Zoom and Canvas. There will be no access to SOACC or any other facilities on campus. The quarter will consist of two projects — one group assignment and a second larger system challenge with several components. We will use Canvas peer reviews and Zoom breakout groups for critiques. Depending on your connectivity issues I might record lectures with Panopto so you can view them outside of class time. 

We will be virtual this quarter — it's a new experience for everyone. But as I noted in my earlier email, designers thrive under constraints. Look for opportunities rather than dwell on what's not possible. This isn't the path any of us want for studio based courses. But we can make the most of a tough situation and put our (virtual) heads together to create some amazing work! 

 

C O M M U N I C A T I O N

Lectures, critiques, group meetings and office hours will be delivered through Zoom (and recorded for later viewing). Use the Zoom link in Canvas to access the class sessions. I set this as a recurring meeting so if you bookmark it once it should work for the other sessions. Password for Zoom sessions is DES369


F I N A L

Thursday June 11 — project is due 
NO CLASS MEETING
(virtual turn-in  before 11:59pm)

 

G R A D I N G

Project One (20%)
Project Two (50%)
Class participation, individual effort and process (30%)

 

G R A D I N G

Capstone project: 60%
Resume/Portfolio website development: 20%
Capstone process/overall participation: 20%

The following criteria is used when determining grades:

3.8–4.0 is given to a student who has exhibited the highest possible performance in all aspects of the course—final projects, the design process and participation are excellent. This student independently seeks out additional information on design and is highly committed/passionate about his/her work.

3.4–3.7 is given to a student who exhibits superior performance in all aspects of the course—the final projects, design process, and participation are uniformly of high quality. This student has a thorough understanding of all concepts presented, and is motivated to improve and succeed.

2.9–3.3 is given to a student who has good performance in most aspects of the course. This student follows a thorough design process, has good design work, and consistent participation that reflects a clear understanding of almost all concepts being presented.

2.5–2.8 is given to a student who has fair performance in the course. The final work is adequate, with a design process that reflects the minimum needed to complete assignments. Participation and motivation are moderate.

0.0–2.4 is given to a student with poor performance in the course. Projects are incorrectly prepared, incomplete or missing. This student does not understand the majority of concepts presented and rarely participates in class. 

 

L A P T O P S / F I L E   S T O R A G E

It is strongly recommended that you back up all work on a weekly basis. You should also make a habit of saving process work (rather than saving over each version as you go). Use a jump drive, buy a portable hard drive, subscribe to a backup service (Crash Plan), use UW server space or iCloud. Make sure that you regularly run any necessary system updates on your laptop to prevent failures and crashes.

 

P L A G I A R I S M

Plagiarism is defined as using in your own work the creations, ideas, words, inventions, or work of someone else without formally acknowledging them through the use of quotation marks, footnotes, bibliography, or other reference. Please check with me if you have questions about what constitutes plagiarism. Instances of plagiarism will be referred to the Vice Provost/Special Assistant to the President for Student Relations and may lead to disciplinary action.

 

A C C O M M O D A T I O N S

UW Disability Resources for Students (http://depts.washington.edu/uwdrs) offers resources and coordinates reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities. If you have already established accommodations with DRS, please communicate your approved accommodations to me at your earliest convenience so we can discuss your needs in this course.

If you have not yet established services through DRS, but have a temporary or permanent disability that requires accommodations (this can include but is not limited to: mental health, attention-related, learning, vision, hearing, physical or health impacts), you are welcome to contact DRS via phone at 206–543–8924, email at uwdrs@uw.edu or online at disability.uw.edu. When you contact the DRS office, their staff will work to establish reasonable accommodations for you through an interactive process between me, you and their office.

 

V I O L E N C E  A W A R E N E S S  +  P R E V E N T I O N

• Preventing violence is everyone’s responsibility. If you’re concerned, tell someone.
• Always call 911 if you or others may be in danger.
• Call 206–685–SAFE (7233) to report non-urgent threats of violence and for referrals to UW counseling and/or safety resources.
• TTY or VP callers, please call through your preferred relay service.
• Don’t walk alone. Campus safety guards can walk with you on campus after dark. Call Husky NightWalk 206–685–WALK (9255).
• Stay connected in an emergency with UW Alert.
• Register your mobile number to receive instant notification of campus emergencies via text and voice messaging.
• Sign up online at www.washington.edu/alert For more information visit the SafeCampus website at www.washington.edu/safecampus.

Catalog Description: 
Investigates organizational strategies and graphic interpretations using typography, images and diverse applications of design, with the objective of creating a related network of dynamic solutions.
Credits: 
5.0
Status: 
Active
Last updated: 
March 30, 2020 - 9:11pm

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