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Art History Grad Student Activities

Submitted on October 6, 2017 - 1:34pm

Graduate students in the Division of Art History are often busy with projects outside the classroom. Here are a few examples from 2017.

Katherine Coty (PhD student) presented a paper titled "The Renaissance Readymade: Displaying Raw Stone in the Cinquecento Garden" at the Renaissance Society of America conference in Chicago near the end of March.

Gloria De Liberali (PhD student) presented a paper at the College Art Association conference in New York City during February. The paper was titled "Annibale Carracci’s Butcher’s Shop: Rethinking Art Theory and Practice of the Naturalistic Reform of Painting." During September, she traveled to Italy to do research. She also attended a seminar on Renaissance sculpture at the Fondazione Zeri in Bologna. Her recent research will be incorporated into a paper she will present at the Sixteenth Century Society & Conference in Milwaukee during late October.

Lane Eagles (PhD candidate) has been working on her dissertation, which will be titled "Illusory Pregnancy: Drapery and the Renaissance Female Body." She presented a paper with the same title at the Renaissance Society of America conference in Chicago during early spring. She also had an article published in The Conversation during September with the title "How fashion adapted to climate change ­– in the Little Ice Age."

Krista Schoening (MA student) received a de Cillia Teaching with Excellence award from the School in June. She has been a Graduate Curatorial Assistant at the Henry Art Gallery. Most recently, she and other staff there have been working on a ninetieth anniversary exhibition that opens in early November. She is researching Florentine still life painter Bartolomeo Bimbi (1648–1723) for her thesis.

Anna Wager (PhD candidate) is working on her dissertation, which will be titled "Kindred Spirits: Communal Making and Religious Revival in Arts and Crafts Movements, 1880-1920." During winter quarter, she presented papers at the Modern Language Association convention in Philadelphia ("Enlargements: Technology and William Morris's Typefaces") and at the College Art Association conference in New York City ("Sculpted Letters: Gills Sans, Humanist Fonts, and Religious Weight"). She co-curated an exhibition at the Delaware Art Museum — The Cover Sells the Book: Transformations in Commercial Book Publishing, 1860-1920 — which was open during the summer. She is a coordinator for a Graduate Research Cluster known as the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Interest Group, which is sponsored by the Simpson Center for the Humanities. The group is hosting JaneFest on November 4 in honor of Jane Austen's life and work.

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