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ART H 443 A: Roman Painting

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Meeting Time: 
MWF 11:30am - 12:20pm
Location: 
MOR 220
SLN: 
10523
Instructor: 
Sarah Levin-Richardson

Syllabus Description:

ARTH/CLAR 443: Roman Painting

Winter 2016

MWF 11:30-12:20

MOR 220

 

Prof. Levin-Richardson

sarahlr@uw.edu

315 Condon Hall

Office Hours: Tuesdays 10-11am; Fridays 1:30-2:30pm; and by appointment

 

Description:

This class surveys and analyzes painting from the Roman world, from the richly decorated villas of ancient Rome to the street signs of ancient Pompeii. In the process, we explore the roles that painted decoration had in the lives of the ancient Romans, from conveying norms about social class and proper gender/sexual behavior, to marking some spaces as for leisure and others for work; to advertising products for sale. This course progresses from the fragmentary frescoes of the Roman Republic (3rd C BCE), to the houses, villas, taverns, and shops preserved by the eruption of Vesuvius in 79 CE, to the paintings adorning Christian burials of the late empire (4th C CE).

 

Learning Objectives:

  • Be able to identify and discuss major works of Roman painting
  • Be able to discuss the production and development of Roman painting
  • Be able to discuss the intersections of Roman painting with Roman society/culture more broadly
  • Be able to find, assess, and analyze scholarship on Roman painting

 

Learning Support:

If you know of something that might impact your learning (travel schedule with UW teams, health or personal crisis, disability) please contact me as soon as possible, ideally at the beginning of the quarter, so that I can make appropriate accommodations. Below you can find further resources:

  • Disability Resources for Students: http://depts.washington.edu/uwdrs/

    • If you have already established accommodations with Disability Resources for Students (DRS), please communicate your approved accommodations to me at your earliest convenience so we can discuss your needs in this course.
    • If you have not yet established services through DRS, but have a temporary health condition or permanent disability that requires accommodations (conditions include but not limited to; mental health, attention-related, learning, vision, hearing, physical or health impacts), you are welcome to contact DRS at 206-543-8924 or uwdrs@uw.edu or uw.edu. DRS offers resources and coordinates reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities and/or temporary health conditions.  Reasonable accommodations are established through an interactive process between you, your instructor(s) and DRS.  It is the policy and practice of the University of Washington to create inclusive and accessible learning environments consistent with federal and state law.
  • UW Academic Support: http://depts.washington.edu/aspuw/more/campus-resources/
  • UW Counseling Center: http://www.washington.edu/counseling/

 

Required Readings:

The required text for this class is listed below and can be found in the U bookstore, as well as on amazon.com and other sites. Other required readings can be found on the course website. Each meeting in the schedule below has one or more readings to be read for that class session. On the Monday of week 2, for example, please come to class having read chapter 10 of the course textbook (which I refer to as Ling on the schedule). These readings are a starting point for in-class lecture and discussion, which often will expand upon the assigned readings and/or present new material. Thus, I strongly recommend careful reading of the assigned material as well as attending class.

 

Ling, Roger. 1991. Roman Painting. Cambridge. [ISBN-10: 0521315956; ISBN-13: 978-0521315951]

 

Grading:

  • Exam 1 (February 1 during class time; covers readings and lectures from January 4 through January 29): 30%
  • 8-10 page Research Project: (part I due February 17 by 2pm; part II due Friday March 11 at the beginning of class time): 30%
  • Exam 2 (March 16 2:30-4:20pm; covers readings and lectures from February 3 through March 11): 40%

 

Exams will cover material both from the assigned readings and from class; as such, it is very important to do the readings and to come to class.

 

Your final course grade is calculated from these assignments in the proportions given. Please prepare carefully for these assignments and please come see me in advance if you have any questions about how to best prepare. There will be no extra credit.

 

The grading scale used in this class is as follows:

 

 

Percentage Earned 

Grade-Point Equivalent

100-98

4.0

97-95

3.9

94

3.8

93

3.7

92-91

3.6

90

3.5

89-88

3.4

87

3.3

86

3.2

85

3.1

84

3.0

83

2.9

82

2.8

81

2.7

80

2.6

79

2.5

78

2.4

77

2.3

76

2.2

75

2.1

74

2.0

73

1.9

72

1.8

71

1.7

70

1.6

69

1.5

68

1.4

67

1.3

66

1.2

65

1.1

64

1.0

63

0.9

62-61

0.8

60

0.7 [lowest passing grade]

59 and x < 59

0.0

 

 

Further Expectations:

  • In class

    • In order to maximize your learning potential and prevent distraction to others, I ask that you do not use cellphones in class, and use laptops only for note-taking purposes.
    • You are responsible for all materials assigned in the readings and covered in lectures. If you miss a class, it is your responsibility to get notes from a classmate.
      • The University of Washington prohibits the selling of notes online or through any other channels.
    • No audio or visual recording of class is permitted without my written authorization. If you are struggling with the pace of lectures, please stop by office hours to chat with me.
    • No posting of course materials of any kind is permitted without my written authorization.
  • Getting in touch with each other
    • Please check your uw email daily; this is how I will communicate with you about pertinent information (such as when study guides are posted, or if class needs to be cancelled for some reason). You are responsible for all information disseminated over email and through the course website.
    • I hold office hours twice a week to be there for you! I am happy to chat with you about class (including any concerns you may have), study abroad opportunities, how to follow your interest in Roman art, etc. If you are anxious about assignments, please come to office hours well in advance of the assignment and we can discuss strategies one-on-one. If you would like to chat but can’t make it to scheduled office hours, just email me and we can find a time to meet.
    • I am happy to answer questions over email, but please check the syllabus first to see whether the answer is there.
    • I will respond to emails by the end of the next working day (which means that if you email me on Friday afternoon, I may not respond until Monday afternoon).
  • Grading
    • Students are expected to adhere to ethical behavior in their work, including following guidelines posted for each assignment concerning group work and plagiarism/cheating.
    • Make-up exams will be given only in the case of documented illness or emergency, or for university-approved events (athletics, etc.), that are cleared with me in advance.
    • I’d be happy to discuss any of your graded work with you, but I ask that you wait twenty-four hours after receiving your exam back in order to begin to process my feedback. After the twenty-four-hour period, please feel free to email me to set up a time to meet. Unfortunately, I cannot discuss grades over email.

 

Schedule of Topics and Required Readings:

 

Week 1: Introduction

M Jan 4: Introduction

W Jan 6: NO CLASS

F Jan 8: NO CLASS; read Ling “Introduction”

 

Week 2: Techniques, Producers and Patrons, and Antecedents

M Jan 11: Ling ch.10

W Jan 13: Ling ch.11

F Jan 15: Ling “Antecedents”

 

Week 3: The Four Styles and Introduction to Roman Domestic Space

M Jan 18: NO CLASS [MLK DAY]

W Jan 20: Ramage, Nancy and Andrew Ramage. 2005. Roman Art: Romulus to Constantine. 4th Edition. Pearson/Prentice Hall. [read pages 83-95 (“Four Pompeian Styles)

F Jan 22: D’Ambra, Eve. 1998. Roman Art. Cambridge. [read pages 126-139]

 

Week 4:  Mixing Public and Private

M Jan 25: Wallace-Hadrill, Andrew. 1994. Houses and Society in Pompeii and Herculaneum. Princeton. [read pages 23-37 (beginning with the paragraph “The illustrations I have chosen”) of chapter 2: “The Language of Public and Private”]

W Jan 27: Leach, E. 2004. The Social Life of Painting in Ancient Rome and on the Bay of Naples, Cambridge. [read pages 110-121 (“Augustan Self-Staging and the Scaenarum Frontes of the Palatine Residence”; “Imperial Revival of the Scaenae Frons”)]

F Jan 29: Wallace-Hadrill 1994  [read pages 38-44 (stop right before “The roman concern”) and 47 (starting with “The differentiation”)-50  (stop right before “This house is valuable evidence”)]

 

Week 5: Landscapes and Gardens

M Feb 1: Exam 1

W Feb 3: Ling 142-149

F Feb 5: Ling 149-153

 

Week 6: Myth

M Feb 8: Bergmann, Bettina. 1996. “The Pregnant Moment: Tragic Wives in the Roman Interior,” in Sexuality in Ancient Art: Near East, Egypt, Greece and Italy, ed. by N. Kampen, Cambridge, pp. 199-218.

W Feb 10: Trimble, Jennifer. 2002. “Myth, Gender, and Social Structure in a Roman House: Two Paintings of Achilles at Pompeii,” in The Ancient Art of Emulation: Studies in Artistic Originality and Tradition from the Present to Classical Antiquity, ed. E. Gazda, Ann Arbor, pp. 225-248.

F Feb 12: Barringer, Judith. 1995. “The Mythological Paintings in the Macellum at Pompeii.” Classical Antiquity 13: 149-166.

 

Week 7: Portraits, Genre scenes, and Burlesque

M Feb 15: NO CLASS [PRESIDENTS’ DAY]

W Feb 17: NO CLASS [research topics and bibliography due via email by 2pm; see file on canvas for details]

F Feb 19: Ling 157-167

 

Week 8: Genre scenes and Burlesque

M Feb 22: Clarke, John. 2003. Art in the Lives of Ordinary Romans: Visual Representation and Non-elite Viewers in Italy, 200 B.C.-A.D. 315, Berkeley. [read pages 4-13, 95-98 and 105-118]

W Feb 24: Clarke, John. 2005. “Representations of the Cinaedus in Roman Art.” Journal of Homosexuality 49: 271-298.  [read pages 271-291]

F Feb 25: Clarke, John. 2006. “High and Low: Mocking Philosophers in the Tavern of the Seven Sages, Ostia,” in The Art of Citizens, Soldiers and Freedmen in the Roman World, eds. E. D’Ambra and G. P. R. Métraux, Oxford, pp. 47-57.

 

Week 9: Other types of Analysis

M Feb 29: Fredrick, David. 1995. “Beyond the Atrium to Ariadne: Erotic Painting and Visual Pleasure in the Roman House.” Classical Antiquity 14: 266-288. [read only pages 266-273, stopping before the paragraph beginning “The mythological panels”]

W March 2: Fredrick 1995 [read only pages 279, starting with “But despite the attractive…” to the end of the article]

F March 4: Bergmann, Bettina. 2013. “Realia: Portable and painted objects from the villa of Boscoreale,” in Actes de “La Renaissance de la Villa de P. Fannius Synistor,” ed. A. Verbanck-Pierard. Paris, pp. 3-27. [read only pp. 3-15; stop before “The sunlit Peristyle”].

 

Week 10: Post-Pompeii Painting

M March 7: Bergmann 2013 [read pages 15-23, starting with “The sunlit Peristyle”]

W March 9: Ling ch.9

F March 11: research projects due 

 

Final Exam: Wednesday March 16, 2016, 2:30-4:20pm, MOR 220

Catalog Description: 
Study of surviving painting from the Roman world, with emphasis on wall paintings from Pompeii and Herculaneum. Principal topics for discussion: the four styles of Pompeian painting the dependence of Roman painters on Greek prototypes, and the significance of various kinds of painting as domestic decoration. Offered: jointly with CL AR 443.
GE Requirements: 
Visual, Literary, and Performing Arts (VLPA)
Status: 
Active
Last updated: 
October 5, 2016 - 9:20pm

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