Inheritance by Katherine Groesbeck

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ART H 343 A: Hellenistic Art And Archaeology

Meeting Time: 
MWF 9:30am - 10:20am
Location: 
SIG 225
SLN: 
10532
Joint Sections: 
CL AR 343 A
Instructor: 
Sarah Levin-Richardson

Syllabus Description:

hellenistic AA poster.jpg

ARTH/CLAR 343: Hellenistic Art and Archaeology

Spring 2017

MWF 9:30-10:20

SIG 225

 

Prof. Levin-Richardson

sarahlr@uw.edu

227 Denny Hall

Office Hours: Mondays and Wednesdays 11am-noon; and by appointment

 

Description:

This course examines the art and architecture of the Greek world (including Greece, western and central Asia, north Africa, and Italy) between the death of Alexander the Great in 323 BCE and the death of Cleopatra in 30 BCE. Major themes will include encounters between Greek and local traditions, the representation of the body, and the relationship of politics to art.

 

Learning Objectives:

  • Be able to identify and discuss major works of Hellenistic art, architecture, and archaeology
  • Be able to discuss the artistic, historic and social/cultural context of Hellenistic art, architecture, and archaeology
  • Be able to discuss the intersection of Hellenistic art, architecture, and archaeology with various types of identities

 

Learning Support:

If you know of something that might impact your learning (travel schedule with UW teams, health or personal crisis, disability) please contact me as soon as possible, ideally at the beginning of the quarter, so that I can make appropriate accommodations. Below you can find further resources:

  • Disability Resources for Students: http://depts.washington.edu/uwdrs/

    • If you have already established accommodations with Disability Resources for Students (DRS), please communicate your approved accommodations to me at your earliest convenience so we can discuss your needs in this course.
    • If you have not yet established services through DRS, but have a temporary health condition or permanent disability that requires accommodations (conditions include but not limited to; mental health, attention-related, learning, vision, hearing, physical or health impacts), you are welcome to contact DRS at 206-543-8924 or uwdrs@uw.edu or uw.edu. DRS offers resources and coordinates reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities and/or temporary health conditions.  Reasonable accommodations are established through an interactive process between you, your instructor(s) and DRS.  It is the policy and practice of the University of Washington to create inclusive and accessible learning environments consistent with federal and state law.
  • UW Academic Support: http://depts.washington.edu/aspuw/more/campus-resources/
  • UW Counseling Center: http://www.washington.edu/counseling/

 

Required Readings:

The required text for this class is listed below and can be found in the U bookstore, as well as on amazon.com and other sites. Other required readings can be found on the course website. Each meeting in the schedule below has one or more readings to be read for that class session. For the second class, for example, please come to class having read pages 19-37 of the course textbook (which I refer to as Pollitt on the schedule). These readings are a starting point for in-class lecture and discussion, which often will expand upon the assigned readings and/or present new material. Thus, I strongly recommend careful reading of the assigned material as well as attending class.

 

Pollitt, J. J. Art in the Hellenistic Age. Cambridge University Press. [ISBN-13: 978-0521276726]

 

Grading:

  • Exam 1 (April 19 during class time; covers readings and lectures from March 27 through April 17): 30%
  • Exam 2 (May 12 during class time; covers readings and lectures from April 21 through May 10): 30%
  • Final Exam (Wednesday June 7, 8:20am; focuses on readings and lectures from May 15 to June 2, with some cumulative questions): 40%

 

The grading scale used in this class can be found at the end of the syllabus. Exams cover material both from the assigned readings and from class; as such, it is very important to do the readings and to come to class. Exams consist of image identifications, image comparisons, and essay questions. Study guides will be provided in advance of each exam.

 

Your final course grade is calculated from these three exams in the proportions given. Please prepare carefully for these exams, and please come see me in advance if you have any questions about how to best study. There will be no extra credit.

 

Further Expectations:

  • In class

    • In order to maximize your learning potential and prevent distraction to others, I ask that you do not use cellphones in class, and use laptops only for note-taking or other class-related purposes.
    • You are responsible for all materials assigned in the readings and covered in lectures. If you miss a class, it is your responsibility to get notes from a classmate.
      • The University of Washington prohibits the selling of notes online or through any other channels.
    • No audio or visual recording of class is permitted without my written authorization. If you are struggling with the pace of lectures, please stop by office hours to chat with me.
    • No posting of course materials of any kind is permitted without my written authorization.
  • Getting in touch with each other
    • Please check your uw email daily; this is how I will communicate with you about pertinent information (such as when study guides are posted, or if class needs to be cancelled for some reason). You are responsible for all information disseminated over email and through the course website.
    • I hold office hours for you! I am happy to chat with you about class (including any concerns you may have), study abroad opportunities, how to follow your interest in Classical art, etc. If you are anxious about exams, please come to office hours before the exam and we can discuss strategies one-on-one. If you would like to chat but can’t make it to scheduled office hours, just email me and we can find a time to meet.
    • I am happy to answer questions over email, but please check the syllabus first to see whether the answer is there.
    • I will respond to emails by the end of the next working day (which means that if you email me on Friday afternoon, I may not respond until Monday afternoon).
  • Grading
    • Students are expected to adhere to ethical behavior in their work, including following guidelines posted for each exam and assignment concerning group work and plagiarism/cheating.
    • Make-up exams will be given only in the case of documented illness or emergency, or for university-approved events (athletics, etc.), that are cleared with me in advance.
    • I’d be happy to discuss any of your graded work with you, but I ask that you wait twenty-four hours after receiving your exam back in order to begin to process my feedback. After the twenty-four-hour period, please feel free to email me to set up a time to meet. Unfortunately, I cannot discuss grades over email.

 

Schedule of Topics and Required Readings:

 

Week 1: Introduction; Portraiture and Sculpture

M March 27: Introduction

W March 29: Royal Iconography (Pollitt 19-37)

F March 31: Lysippos and his school (Pollitt 47-58)

 

Week 2: Sculpture

M April 3: Hellenistic “Baroque” (Pollitt 111-126)

W April 5:Hellenistic "Baroque"

  • Stewart, Andrew. 2005. “Hellenistic Art, AD 1500-2000.” In A Companion to the Hellenistic World, ed. Andrew Erskine. Blackwell. 494-514. (Read only pp. 494-500, stopping before section two, and pp. 506-507, beginning with “Today, most commentators…” and stopping before section 3)
  • Review Pollitt 120-126

F April 7: “Rococo” (Pollitt 127-141)

 

Week 3: Sculpture

M April 10: Realism and the exotic (Pollitt 141-149)

W April 12: neoclassicism and archaism (Pollitt 164-184)

F  April 14: NO CLASS

 

Week 4: Cities and Sanctuaries

M April 17: review

W April 19:  exam 1

F April 21: Billows, Richard. 2005. “Cities.” In A Companion to the Hellenistic World, ed. Andrew Erskine. Blackwell. 196-215. (read only pp. 196-197, stopping before “in all of this one can see,” and section 2)

 

Week 5: Cities and Sanctuaries

M April 24: Theatricality (Pollitt 230-242, stopping before the section on “didactic tradition”)

W April 26: Parke, H. W. 1986. “The Temple of Apollo at Didyma: The Building and its Function.” Journal of Hellenic Studies 106: 121-131.

F April 28 Attalid victory monuments (Pollitt 79-97)

 

Week 6: Cities and Sanctuaries; Palace and Domestic décor

M May 1: Altar of Zeus (Pollitt 97-110)

W May 3: Mosaics (Pollitt 210-229)

F May 5: Westgate, R.C. 2000. “Space and Decoration in Hellenistic Houses.” Journal of the British School at Athens 95: 391-426. (read only pp. 391-400, stopping before the section “Decoration in Houses on Delos”)

 

Week 7: Domestic décor

M May 8: Westgate 2000. (read only pp. 400-410, stopping before “The contrast between,” and p. 414, starting with the paragraph beginning “these houses” and stopping before the next section)

W May 10: review

F May 12: exam 2

 

Week 8: Culture Contact

M May 15: Egypt (Pollitt 250-263)

W May 17: Library of Alexandria:

  • Heller-Roazen, Daniel. 2002. “On the Library of Alexandria.” October 100: 133-153. (read only pp. 134-143, stopping before the section heading “pinacography”)
  • Serageldin, Ismail. 2014. “Building tomorrow’s library today: The New Library of Alexandria.” International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions 40: 169-173. (read only through p. 171, stopping before the section "Remaining innovative")

F May 19: Egypt: Rowlandson, Jane. 2005. “Town and country in Ptolemaic Egypt.” In A Companion to the Hellenistic World, ed. Andrew Erskine. Blackwell. 249-263.

 

Week 9: Culture Contact

M May 22: The Hellenistic East: Leriche, Pierre. 2002. “The Greeks in the Orient: from Syria to Bactria.” In The Greeks Beyond the Aegean: From Marseilles to Bactria, ed. Bassos Karageorghis. New York: Alexander S. Onassis Public Benefit Foundation. 78-128. (read only pp. 78-87, stopping before “Hellenistic Syria,” and pp. 111-124, stopping before “conclusion”)

W May 24: The Hellenistic East: Holt, Frank. 2012. “Coins: ‘The Great Guides of the Historian.’” In Afghanistan: Forging Civilizations along the Silk Road, eds. Joan Aruz and Elisabetta Valtz Fino. New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art. 30-41.

F May 26: Rome (Pollitt 150-163)

 

Week 10: Culture Contact

M May 29: NO CLASS (MEMORIAL DAY)

W May 31: Rome: Zanker, Paul. 1988. The Power of Images in the Age of Augustus, trans. A. Shapiro. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press. (read only pp. 44-65, stopping before the section on Architecture)

F June 2: final exam review

 

final exam: Wednesday June 7, 8:20-10:20am, SIG 225

 

The grading scale for this class is:

 

 

Percentage Earned 

Grade-Point Equivalent

100-96

4.0

95

3.9

94

3.8

93

3.7

92-91

3.6

90

3.5

89-88

3.4

87

3.3

86

3.2

85

3.1

84

3.0

83

2.9

82

2.8

81

2.7

80

2.6

79

2.5

78

2.4

77

2.3

76

2.2

75

2.1

74

2.0

73

1.9

72

1.8

71

1.7

70

1.6

69

1.5

68

1.4

67

1.3

66

1.2

65

1.1

64

1.0

63

0.9

62-61

0.8

60

0.7 [lowest passing grade]

59 and x < 59

0.0

 

 

 

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Catalog Description: 
Survey of the art of Greece and the eastern Mediterranean from the time of Alexander the Great to the Roman conquest. Principal sites with their sculpture, painting, mosaics, and minor arts examined in lectures illustrated with slides. Offered: jointly with CL AR 343.
GE Requirements: 
Visual, Literary, and Performing Arts (VLPA)
Credits: 
3.0
Status: 
Active
Last updated: 
January 10, 2018 - 9:21pm

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