(balancing one’s own weight in a shadow of antithetical sides) by Paul Baughman

You are here

DESIGN 369 A: Visual Systems

Meeting Time: 
MW 11:30am - 2:20pm
Location: 
ART 247
SLN: 
21098
Instructor:
Christopher Ozubko
Christopher Ozubko

Syllabus Description:

Design Systems | Des369 | 2017 Spring Quarter

247 Art building  | 11.30–2.20p | Monday + Wednesday

Professor Christopher Ozubko ozubko@uw.edu

Office hours: Wednesdays 2.30-3.30p | 253 Art building 

Course Overview + Learning Goals

This course will focus on the creation and development of a cohesive, innovative graphic system applied across a variety of media formats. Students in this class will explore organizational strategies and graphic interpretations of ideas using typography and imagery, with the objective of creating a related network of dynamic solutions. Everything covered in Advanced Typography, Visualizations, Branding/Corp ID and Design for Mobile Experiences will be utilized in this class.

The challenge when developing a comprehensive design program is to present a compelling message and visual language without becoming repetitive or disjointed in the execution. Topics covered in this course include:

1) The construction of meaning through verbal and visual language;

2) Designing for a system (rather than a single product) that includes a wide range of media formats & sizes;

3) Integrating color, type, imagery and graphic elements to produce a compelling visual language that reinforces the chosen theme/topic;

4) Using a rigorous design process to develop provocative and smart solutions;

5) Issues related to audience, image creation and production.

Course Structure + Requirements

The first three weeks of the quarter will focus on form explorations and rapid experimentation. The remainder of the quarter will be devoted to one large project with several components. Class time will be split between lectures, critiques, discussions and workdays. For large critiques the class will be split into two groups (A and B). One group will present on Mondays, the other will present on Wednesdays. A detailed schedule will be presented with the longer assignment.

Course Web Site

See Canvas.

References and occasional readings will be posted. You are expected to complete all readings even if they are not explicitly discussed in class.

Recommended Reading

Dynamic Identities: How to Create a Living Brand by Irene van Nes

Graphic Design, Referenced: A Visual Guide to the Language, Applications, and History of Graphic Design by Armin Vit

Festivals Graphics published by Index Books

GeoGraphics: Simple Form Graphics in Print and Motion by Victionary

Hands On: Interactive Design in Print by Victionary

Genius Moves: 100 Icons of Graphic Design by Steven Heller

Introducing Culture Identities: Design for Museums, Theaters and Cultural Institutions edited by R. Klanten, A. Sinofzik and F. Schulze

Print Work: Capture the Best Publication and Promotion by Victionary

The Designer and the Grid by Lucienne Roberts + Julia Thrift

Universal Principles of Design by William Lidwell + Kritina Holden + Jill Butler

For additional material, visit the References section on the course web site.

Learning Environment

Consider this class an open forum for ideation and discussion. Debate and disagreement are a natural part of design discourse. Sharing ideas and work in progress will benefit everyone. You are expected to produce all work with consistent effort and creativity. The most successful students start with the basic assignment and go beyond it on their own initiative: trying out new directions, experimenting with varied processes, and working hard to understand the principles in new contexts. The best work comes to people who take risks and who learn to thrive on challenges and uncertainty. You should be willing to take chances, experiment formally, and push the work in new directions in an effort to broaden your own visual language.

Be respectful of your colleagues. Please clean up your space after class and critique sessions. Cell phones should be off during class. Lap tops are for class assignments only. Do not use Instagram or Facebook during class. You are expected to remain in class for the entire lecture, critique or work session.

Policies + Evaluation

Attendance is required for all class sessions. Please make every effort to be on time. All work (process and final) should be completed and ready by the beginning of class. Late work is heavily discouraged and will not be accepted without prior permission. Grading is based on the quality of your work during the quarter (both visually and conceptually); on your design process (the extent of exploration and variation throughout the project) and on class participation in group discussions and critiques. The following criteria is used when determining grades:

3.8–4.0 is given to a student who has exhibited the highest possible performance in all aspects of the course—final projects, the design process and participation are excellent. This student independently seeks out additional information on design and is highly committed/passionate about their work.

3.4–3.7 is given to a student who exhibits superior performance in all aspects of the course—the final projects, design process, and participation are uniformly of high quality. This student has a thorough understanding of all concepts presented, and is motivated to improve and succeed.

2.9–3.3 is given to a student who has good performance in most aspects of the course. This student follows a thorough design process, has good design work, and consistent participation that reflects a clear understanding of almost all concepts being presented.

2.5–2.8 is given to a student who has fair performance in the course. The final work is adequate, with a design process that reflects the minimum needed to complete assignments. Participation and motivation are moderate.

0.0–2.4 is given to a student with poor performance in the course. Projects are incorrectly prepared, incomplete or missing. This student does not understand the majority of concepts presented and rarely participates in class. This student is not prepared for subsequent courses in design.

Note: All students are required to pass every design studio class with a minimum grade of 2.5. Receiving a grade below the 2.5 benchmark will result in a one-quarter probationary period. Continued failure to pass subsequent design studio courses with a minimum 2.5 grade will result in expulsion from the design major.

Email and Correspondence

Class announcements are sent to students via CANVAS. Check your UW email daily. As a matter of policy, no assignments will be critiqued through email. Use fellow students, class critiques and office hours for feedback. 

Software

Access to Adobe Creative Suite (cs6 or higher) is required for this course. Design majors in the upper division are expected to have solid working knowledge of the Adobe Creative Suite. If you need help with software go to the Adobe online forums, Lynda.com or the UW Catalyst web site at catalyst.washington.edu for workshop dates and times. Don’t let a lack of familiarity with software prohibit you from realizing your ideas. You can also utilize Sketch (or any other mobile app software you are familiar with) when developing the mobile application portion of your system. After Effects will be required for some components in your system. Check out Adobe XD for prototyping.

Laptops/File Storage

It is strongly recommended that you back up your work every week. Use some kind of logical file naming system (saving every file as “369_1 or 369_stuff” will get confusing). Save process/iteration files rather than writing over the same file after every critique. You never know when you will need to refer back to a previous design direction. Make sure you run the necessary system updates on your laptop to prevent failures and crashes. Questions about laptop memory and software can be directed to fellow classmates or any of the Design faculty.

Supplies

Bring your laptop to every class, unless you are told otherwise. You should have access to a digital camera of some kind. If you don’t own camera you can check one out through Kane Hall or soacc (two day check out). iPads are also available for checkout through soacc.

Students with Disabilities

If you would like to request academic accommodations due to a disability, please contact Disabled Student Services, 448 Schmitz, 543.8924 (v/tty). If you have a letter from Disabled Student Services indicating you have a disability that requires academic accommodations, please present it to me so we can discuss any accommodations you might need for class. 

Plagiarism

Plagiarism is defined as using in your own work the creations, ideas, words, inventions, or work of someone else without formally acknowledging them through the use of quotation marks, footnotes, bibliography, or other reference. Please check with course faculty if you have questions about what constitutes plagiarism. Instances of plagiarism will be referred to the Vice Provost/Special Assistant to the President for Student Relations and may lead to disciplinary action.

Violence Awareness and Prevention

• Preventing violence is everyone’s responsibility. If you’re worried, tell someone.

• Call 206.685.safe (7233) to report non-urgent threats of violence and for referrals to uw counseling and/or safety resources.

• Don’t walk alone. Campus safety guards can walk with you on campus after dark. Call Husky NightWalk 206.685.walk (9255).

• Stay connected in an emergency with uw Alert.

• Register your mobile number to receive instant notification of campus emergencies via text and voice messaging.

• Sign up online at www.washington.edu/alert.

• For more information visit the SafeCampus website at www.washington.edu/safecampus.

Project Outline

Design program for a Conference on “WOOD, as a sustainable, multifunctional & cultural material”

Create a comprehensive design program for an “international conference” on “wood”,  a diminishing precious natural material. Frame the conference around one of the following themes (as it relates to forestry or wood products ): society, technology, environment, economics, urbanization, sustainability, or deforestation. Your audience will be architects, environmentalists, legislators, educators, urban planners, community activists, researchers, representatives of non-profit institutions and foundations, international organizations and government officials.

You can initiate a conference that addresses broad questions about one of the themes listed above, or you can locate a specific question or issue within a narrow section of one theme. Don’t try to address all these themes in one conference as this will make it difficult to develop a unique message and visual language. For instance, your conference could celebrate a particular type of material (bamboo for example). Or you could create a conference could be dedicated to the experimental products made from wood fibers. Your event could focus on a innovative wood building materials vs. repurposing and recycling virgin growth. If topics are similar you are welcome to work in groups during the research phase of the project. The final visual solution will be developed on your own though.

Once you choose a conference topic and theme, generate the content for the various components. Give your conference a name (something memorable). You must write a short introductory paragraph/s explaining the purpose and theme of the conference. Choose a date (1–3 days is best), location (city/venue) and speakers (at least five, one being your “keynote/introductory” speaker). Include a short bio and, if possible, a photo for each speaker (for the conference website and mobile application).

Final deliverables will include the following:

1) Identity/logotype lockup consisting of the conference name, date, tag line and corresponding visual language. This identity and visual language will be applied to all conference materials.

2)Single-sided poster, 24x36 inches, with accompanying booklet. Content to include: event name, tag line, date, location, website url, and a brief paragraph explaining the conference theme. Speakers names are optional. OR Double-sided poster, 24x36 inches with detailed information on reverse. Content should include: event name, tag line, date, location, website url, and a brief paragraph explaining the conference theme. Speakers names are optional.

3) At least two 10 second (give or take) videos/bumpers: one general spot to announce the conference, one to introduce a select speaker (which could be applied to other speakers as well). You can make more spots if you like.

4) Web site: home page plus two interior pages (example: registration + speaker list). Show how the site adapts to a mobile device. These can be static screens, you don’t need to build them unless you want to.

5) Mobile app to be used during the conference (3 sample screens: welcome, speaker list, schedule of events).

6) Environmental piece (large scale item like a banner or signage at the venue to identify the conference —on the stage, on a bus, at a bus stop).

7) Ticket for conference entry (lanyard, name tag, wristband etc).

8) One piece of swag for conference goers (shirt, bag, merchandise, etc).

9) Conference program booklet if creating one-sided poster. Also optional in addition to 2 sided poster.

Grading Criteria

Your solution will be judged on the following criteria:

1) uniqueness—how is your solution different, does it stand apart from what’s out there now;

2) quality—form and message are well executed across all media types;

3) value—does your conference program (identity, visual language, messaging and implementation) offer a compelling experience for its intended audience.

There are four main steps to this project.

All parts of the design process listed below are critical to the success of the overall program.

Multiple iterations for each step are expected.

1) research your selected theme in depth:

find any existing/related conferences, look for experts/possible speakers or any relevant content regarding your conference topic and theme

2) analyze your research:

What is your intention with this project? What are the areas of opportunity for expression and interpretation? Are their possibilities offered by audience familiarity with the subject matter?

3) propose conceptual and visual directions.

“Doing a layout means having an idea” What are you trying to communicate to your intended audience? What visuals can support that idea? How can those visuals be compelling and unique?

Generate lots of visuals at first, you won’t solve it in the first week—but don’t wait until week nine to ideate either!

4) implement the identity and corresponding visuals across multiple components.

Your design must be scalable and work in a variety of sizes, materials and media formats such as interactive, motion and print. Be flexible and address potential problems as soon as they come up. Don’t ignore issues as they will cause heartache later!

Work hard, right from the start. You have eight + weeks to work through this—some weeks will seem more productive than others. You will need to slog through some less than stellar ideas first to get to a unique and compelling solution. You should always be working (thinking, looking around, sketching, making, talking etc). Try to avoid only doing the short bursts of work the night before a deadline. Those stints rarely result in worthwhile solutions.

Course Schedule

...........................................................................................................................

WEEK 1

Mon 27 March

Course introduction; Research theme and conference websites—start exploring and making notes!

Wed 29 March

Large Project introduction; Lecture (Components of a Program)—ideation begins.

...........................................................................................................................

WEEK 2

Mon 3 April

GROUPS  A + B | Digital presentation:

Ideas for at least THREE themes presented with accompanying background and content.

Upload to CANVAS by 9.00a Monday 03 April 

 

Wed 5 April

Work session, individual meetings with instructor.

...........................................................................................................................

WEEK 3

Mon 10 April

GROUP A Presentation to class | Print presentation:

Multiple type, image, color + form studies printed on 11x17 inch (build on previous ideas).

Wed 12 April

GROUP B Presentation to class | Print presentation:

Multiple type, image, color + form studies printed on 11x17 inch (build on previous ideas).

...........................................................................................................................

WEEK 4

Mon 17 April

GROUPS  A + B | Digital presentation to class.

Review of ideas/themes for conference (two options, with suggested conference names, key phrases describing the conference, and corresponding moodboard/ visual language for each idea). Ideas are most important here, not the execution of the idea. Upload to CANVAS by 9.00a Monday 17 April

Wed 19 April

Review continues as needed + work session

...........................................................................................................................

WEEK 5

Mon 24 April

GROUP A Presentation to class | Print presentation

First pass at Conference identity and visual language applied to the poster, sample environmental piece and one digital component (think about scale shifts and media opportunities when first working through the identity).

Wed 26 April

GROUP B Presentation to class | Print presentation

First pass at Conference identity and visual language applied to the poster, sample environmental piece and one digital component (think about scale shifts and media opportunities when first working through the identity).

...........................................................................................................................

WEEK 6

Mon 1 May

Group A critique | Digital presentation      Group B work session.

resolved + refined Conference identity and visual language applied to the poster, web site homepage, environmental piece, and swag item. Upload to CANVAS by 9.00a Monday 01 May

Wed 3 May

Group B critique | Digital presentation      Group A work session.

resolved + refined Conference identity and visual

language applied to the poster, web site homepage, environmental piece, and swag item. 

Upload to CANVAS by 9.00a Wednesday 03 May

...........................................................................................................................

WEEK 7

Mon 8 May

Group A critique | Presentation of motion elements

Wed 10 May

Group B critique | Presentation of motion elements

...........................................................................................................................

WEEK 8

Mon 15 May

Group A all class critique: refined Conference identity and visual language applied to the poster (with all content), web site, mobile app, bumper, environmental piece, and swag item. Print proofs.

Wed 17 May

Group B all class critique: refined Conference identity and visual language applied to the poster (with all content), web site, mobile app, bumper, environmental piece, and swag item. Print proofs.

...........................................................................................................................

WEEK 9

Mon 22 May

Group A critique: full program (all components).       Group B work session.

Resolved and approved to print.

Wed 24 May

Group B critique: full program (all components).      Group A work session.

Resolved and approved to print.

...........................................................................................................................

WEEK 10

Mon 29        NO SCHOOL

Wed 31 May

Work session, individual meetings with instructor.

...........................................................................................................................

WEEK 11    FINALS WEEK  CRITIQUE

Thursday 8 June   8.30-10.20a

FINAL final presentations        Upload all class projects to CANVAS

...........................................................................................................................

please note: schedule may change

Catalog Description: 
Investigates organizational strategies and graphic interpretations using typography, images and diverse applications of design, with the objective of creating a related network of dynamic solutions.
Credits: 
5.0
Status: 
Active
Last updated: 
January 10, 2018 - 9:03pm

AddToAny

Share